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680 Red Table Dr. Gypsum, CO 81637
(970) 524-3647
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Anesthesia -We use many different forms of anesthesia at Gypsum Animal Hospital and it is tailored individually for each patient. Even though it is performed on a daily basis it is anything but routine, and we take anesthesia very seriously.

Before anesthesia patients are thoroughly examined by one of our doctors and blood is taken for pre-op labs. These pre-op labs tell us a lot about what is going on inside your pet that we cannot see such as immune system function, kidney and liver function, blood sugar levels etc. This is one area of medicine where we are pretty inflexible; we will not do anesthesia without pre-op laboratory tests.

Our anesthesia machine is state-of-the-art and is used to deliver gas anesthesia. Gas anesthesia is the safest anesthesia because it allows us to easily control the level, or depth, of anesthesia.

To administer anesthesia a Teflon IV catheter is inserted into your pets’ vein. An ‘inducing agent’ is given intravenously through the catheter; this allows us to place a tube, called an endotracheal tube, into your pets’ trachea to deliver the gas.

The catheter is an important piece of Teflon because if there is an emergency we have immediate access to a vein to administer life saving drugs. Again we are very firm in our practice here; IV catheters should always be used for anesthesia.

Lastly, during anesthesia we monitor your pet using a PULSE OXIMETER. A small probe is attached to the tongue and it tells us blood oxygen levels and pulse rate via ‘beeps’ we can hear during surgery. Everyone who visits our OR wants to check their own oxygen levels using our pulse ox and we have fun with it!

anesthesia1

Our gas anesthesia machine is used to deliver Isoflourane anesthesia, one of the safest and most widely used anesthetic agents.

anesthesia2

A patient under anesthesia is monitored using our pulse oximeter. 96% oxygen saturation and a pulse of 102...pretty good.

Below is a lik to an article written for The Vail Daily about anesthesia

Anesthesia for Your Pet

Veterinary Topics